12 Best Metronomes

When it comes to practice—whether you play bass, guitar, drums, or otherwise—if you aren’t using a metronome, you are missing out. How else are you going to keep track of time and beats?

But how do you pick the best metronome? They aren’t all created equal. Some are better for beginners and some are built for the pros. You may prefer an old-fashioned mechanical metronome, or you may want a newer electronic one. Some are simply used to keep time, but others serve as tuners and even tone generators.

Take a look at our pick of the top 12 performing metronomes and find the one that suits your needs, regardless of what instrument you play.

Creatov Mechanical Metronome—Best Metronome for Beginners

If you are looking for a simple metronome with a classic design, the Creatov Mechanical Metronome may be exactly what you need. The Creatov features an old-fashioned pyramid design and a basic mechanical wind-up, as well as a simple set and sway pendulum with a classic tick-tock loud enough to hear over your music.

Straightforward Design

Creatov’s mechanical metronome is meant to make it as easy as possible to track your beats. It doesn’t feature a lot of bells and whistles so that you can focus on what matters most: your practice.

Just set the tempo (from 40 to 208 beats per minute), wind it up, and get to work. This metronome is battery-free, so it really is as simple as can be to set up. The 100% mechanical operation helps to ensure a long life and durable construction.

We recommend the Creatov for people who are just getting started or are looking for a very affordable metronome to use.

Pros:

  • Easy to use
  • Classic design
  • No batteries or electronics
  • Price

Cons:

  • Single function (it only keeps time)
  • Some users report that the metronome breaks easily.

Tempi Metronome— A Beautiful Mechanical Metronome

While the Creatov is an excellent simple metronome for beginners, the Tempi is a step up when it comes to classic mechanical models. The Tempi is another easy-to-set, wind-up metronome in the classic pyramid design, but it also features a sleek faux wood veneer for improved aesthetics.

The Tempi, like the Creatov, can set the BPM between 40 and 208.

Free Music Lessons

One thing that really makes the Tempi an ideal choice for beginners is that your purchase comes not only with a free E-book, but it also includes two months of free online music lessons.

Two-Year Warranty

While the price tag is slightly higher than the Creatov, you can feel comfortable knowing that your purchase is backed by Tempi’s 2-year warranty.

We recommend the Tempi for beginners who need a metronome and who may also have interest in long-term online music lessons.

Pros:

  • Aesthetically pleasing classic design
  • Simple to use
  • Freebies included

Cons:

  • Single function (it only keeps time)
  • Low manufacturing quality compared to higher priced models

Korg TM50— An Affordable Combo Tuner Metronome

The Korg TM50 is an electronic metronome that also functions as a tuner; both features can be used together or on their own. The design is simple for a more-advanced device. The tuner controls are on the left side, and metronome controls are on the right.

The Korg TM50 has a wider tempo range than the mechanical models we’ve looked at so far, offering anywhere from 30 to 252 beats per minute. The “tap tempo” button even allows you to set the beat simply by tapping at the desired tempo.

Innovative Sound Back

The TM50’s sound back feature makes learning pitch and tuning your instruments a great deal easier. Not only does the LCD needle show the difference between the desired note and yours, but the tuner will also sound the reference note audibly—providing you with two methods of tracking the pitch.

We recommend the Korg TM50 for anyone who needs both a metronome and tuner at a relatively affordable price tag.

Pros:

  • Dual function as metronome and tuner
  • Sound back feature makes tuning easy

Cons:

  • The metronome “beep” may take some getting used to.

GuitarX X7—An Affordable 3-in-1 Tuner, Metronome, and Tone Generator

The GuitarX X7 is a very modestly priced model that serves as an electronic tuner, metronome, and tone generator. Right out of the box, the X7 is easy to use and read. The full color display features very large numbers, so you won’t be squinting as you tune.

The simple, five-button function also makes the X7 a cinch for beginners. Fortunately, the simplicity doesn’t get in the way of functionality. It still has a wide range of tempos and also features tuning modes – guitar, bass, violin, ukulele, and chromatic.

Very Low Price

With three functions, you might be wondering why the X7 is priced about half as much as the Korg TM50. Well, this model is certainly affordable, but what you make up for in your wallet, you’ll pay for in lifespan…

Short Lifespan

Many online reviews complain of the GuitarX X7 as having a very short lifespan. These issues do not simply refer to the batteries draining. The X7 does have some reliability issues that leave it virtually unusable for some users. In other words, you get what you pay for.

We don’t recommend the X7, despite its 3-in-1 features. The cheap price tag is just too indicative of its cheap quality.

Pros:

  • Triple functions—metronome, tuner, and tone generator
  • Low price tag

Cons:

  • Short lifespan reported by many users.

KLIQ MetroPitch—A Reliable 3-in-1 Tuner, Metronome, and Tone Generator

At approximately the same price as the GuitarX, the KLIQ MetroPitch is a much more reliable choice for those hunting for a pocket-sized, multi-function metronome, tuner, and tone generator.

The MetroPitch offers numerous innovative and likeable features, including a built-in kickstand, a sleek metal finish, and a JOG dial that makes every function easier to use.

No-Questions-Asked Warranty

KLIQ is a reliable name for those seeking an affordable 3-in-1 device. In addition, you don’t need to worry about the low price tag. The MetroPitch comes with a three=year warranty that allows you to either have your device replaced or receive your money back.

Versatile Tuning

The MetroPitch stands out as being built for tuning just about any instrument and allowing you to use either the speakers or the input jack.

We recommend the MetroPitch for anyone looking for a reliable tuner, tone generator, and metronome at a price that’s right.

Pros:

  • Durable, pocket-sized design
  • Affordable 3-function model
  • Impressive warranty

Cons:

  • Speaker is on the back, so it may be difficult to hear.

Korg KDM-2 True Tone Advanced Digital Metronome—A Metronome that’s Easy to Hear

The Korg KDM-2 makes up where the MetroPitch sometimes fails: volume. The KDM-2 features Korg’s trademark cylindrical resonator, which broadcasts the sound loudly and clearly, enabling it to be heard no matter how loud you’re playing. Even better, you can choose from three different metronome sounds to keep your time.

Remember Your Settings

The KDM-2 will even remember all of the settings from your last session—even when you turn it off. This means you can cut your practice short when you need to and pick up exactly where you left off

Tap Your Tempo

Like some other models, the KDM-2 allows you to tap the desired tempo, making it a versatile choice in a metronome.

We recommend the Korg KDM-2 for anyone looking for a mid-priced digital metronome for practicing particularly loud instruments or for those who practice in rooms with a lot of echo.

Pros:

  • Memory for settings
  • Easy to hear
  • Multiple metronome sounds

Cons:

  • Some users report a short product lifespan.

Artisan Guitar Tuner & Metronome—A Beautiful 3-in-1 Metronome

Artisan’s clip-on digital metronome/tuner/tone generator hybrid features a colorful display like no other. It boasts a wide range of tuning and tone options to fit almost any stringed instrument, and the metronome can be set to three different volumes, in addition to a silent visual beat.

Full Color LCD Display

Artisan’s colorful digital display was specially designed to be visible in just about any light setting, and it provides instant visual cues to help you get your instrument tuned as quickly as possible.

We recommend the Artisan for people looking for an excellent 3-in-1 metronome for their string instrument, as well as one that’s very affordably priced.

Pros:

  • Beautiful display
  • Inexpensive
  • Triple function —metronome, tuner, and tone generator

Cons:

  • Best for string instruments
  • Some might prefer a less gaudy display.

Seiko DM51 Clip-On Metronome—A Metronome For Those on the Go

The Seiko SM51 is a little different from the other metronomes we looked at. A large number of users actually love it for keeping rhythm while they walk, run, or even ice skate. However, it also functions well as a musical metronome.

The DM51’s functions are fairly simple, with just four buttons to control power, tempo, volume, and beat. It also features a compact, sturdy design, which might explain why it’s so popular with runners.

Loud, Adjustable Sound

The volume is adjustable, but people on the move love that the Seiko DM51 produces a very audible sound at its loudest settings.

We recommend the DM51 for people looking to keep cadence with various physical activities, but it can also function quite well for musicians looking for a very affordable and sturdy single- function metronome.

Pros:

  • Durable clip-on construction
  • Easily heard sound
  • Affordable

Cons:

  • Single function device (works only as a metronome)

Boss DB-30 Dr. Beat Metronome—A Reliable Pocket-sized Metronome

The Boss DB-30 is a metronome built to work hard. It’s got everything you could expect from a metronome, all bundled together in a tiny package that you can take anywhere. Twenty-four separate beats and 9 rhythms ensure that you can find the pace you need for your practice, and the visual display even shows a digital pendulum swinging back and forth to assist you in keeping time.

Simple to Use

The DB-30 doesn’t have many bells and whistles, but its 7-button interface will give you just about anything you need in a simple function metronome that’s very easy to configure and get running.

We recommend the DB-30 if you are looking for a reliable, mid-priced digital metronome without too many special functions, but still offering a bit of customizability.

Pros:

  • Easy to use
  • Multiple beats and rhythms
  • Compact design

Cons:

  • Single function device (works only as a metronome)

Seiko SQ50-V Quartz Metronome—Best Simple Metronome

The Seiko SQ50-V Quartz is the perfect little metronome to keep in your case and have with you at all times. Maybe you opt for something more advanced when you’re practicing for real in your garage, but this little guy is ideal for impromptu sessions and on-the-go practice.

No Button Function

A master of simplicity, the SQ50-V works without a single button. Simply turn the dial to the desired tempo, choose from two types of click sounds, and watch the LED blink with the beat. It also features an earphone input (mono only) and adjustable volume knob.

We recommend the SQ50-V as a standard addition to any practice kit. It’s just so portable, simple, and affordable that you don’t have a reason not to have one.

Pros:

  • Easy to use
  • Very affordable
  • Compact size

Cons:

  • Very limited in features

Matrix MR600 Deluxe Metronome—Best Advanced Quartz Metronome

The Matrix can be thought of as the SQ50-V’s big brother. It’s another quartz metronome with a dial setting, but it features an extra range of downbeats and a more visually pleasing LED simulated pendulum than the SQ50-V.

Classic Sound, Modern Display

The Matrix MR600 uses the classic click for the metronome sound, which many users prefer to a digital beep. However, showing a modern twist on old-fashioned metronomes, the Matrix also uses a series of green LEDs to simulate a pendulum and has a red light on the downbeat.

Simple Setup

Turn the dial to your desired tempo, position the switch to your downbeat, and get playing.

We recommend the MR600 for those looking for a relatively simple dial-set metronome, but need a bit more customization than the Seiko SQ50-V has to offer.

Pros:

  • Easy to use
  • Simple but customizable
  • LED pendulum

Cons:

  • Some users complained of short product lifespan.

Boss DB-90 Metronome—Best Luxury Metronome

The Boss DB-90 has to be our top pick if you are looking for a metronome that does everything. While it might be a bit pricier than some other models, you are getting exactly what you pay for with the DB-90.

Built For Anything

The DB-90 advertises itself as a metronome designed for any musician: guitar, vocals, keys, and so on. No matter what you play, it will work for you.

Awesome Luxury Features

In addition to the usual assortment of clicks, the Boss DB-90 also includes a human voice count. It features an onboard rhythm coach especially for drummers, and even a note mixing capability to build your very own beats.

While the DB-90 probably is not be the best choice for beginners, it has our top recommendation for musicians who want to take their practice using a metronome to the next level—or for those who need to have all the bells and whistles.

Pros:

  • Great for any type of musician
  • Very customizable
  • Long lifespan

Cons:

  • A tad expensive (but worth the cost)
  • Some features are complicated to use.

How To Use A Metronome & How it Works

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